Models and Problems

This is my brain performing “massage”….any questions?  🙂

There is nothing better than a person who is health and wellness minded coming to me for massage. You don’t really have to convince them of the benefits or teach them about its affects on their body because they are already informed and on board. Instead, as you work with them, they learn more about their body’s movement patterns and underlying stored tensions, making release and corrective care all the more possible. After a series of sessions they will be right at home in their new state of being and come to you for follow ups whenever they feel the need for them. Sigh…if only all client situations were like this.

One client that I have been working with now for a few weeks fits the model client moniker to a tee. He comes in with stories and updates on the results of his last session and what his activities/work/lifestyle have procured for me this time around. I share him with another therapist. We both approach his motley crew of issues with different perspectives and techniques, but always end up with some kind of change/result. This weekly challenge is such a learning process for myself. Having to get creative in order to circumvent limitations and other obstacles takes me away from my usual approach to a particular muscle issue and brings back the spark of why I got into this profession in the first place. It also makes me hungry for more education, which (lucky me) New York State is going to require in just a few short months to renew my license. I do my little happy dance post session, when I can see the effects of the work; a little less rounding of the shoulders, an arm fully flexing up to one’s ear, a little pain free spring in one’s step. It’s a great feeling.

In contrast to the model client, is the problem client. They come in many forms, sometimes seeking out massage on their own or having it forced on them by a health care professional or a loved one. They almost never feel comfortable with anything you may try out to address their issue(s), that is if they can pinpoint what it/they are in the first place. They don’t communicate their feelings easily or over communicate as in “choreograph” the entire massage session. On the one hand, I welcome clients being specific about where their trouble spots are and what they prefer me to do; however, one has to be a little reasonable. After all, there is a flow involved with a good massage and jumping back and forth between body parts, over flipping from supine to prone or over working a particular region or muscle kind of kills that vibe.

A funny thing happened a few weeks ago with one such problem client. After a handful of sessions where said client answered all my intake questions with shrugs and my inquiries on our work with a down-tempo “it’s ok” I had become a little more than frustrated. I was starting to gas out completely and couldn’t count down the minutes until our session ended. No longer client centered and feeling drained, I stopped focusing and sort of mindlessly moved about the tissues and musculature I was addressing. My zombie massage was, to me, the worst massage I could ever give a person. However, in this state, my problem client finally let go. In my daze, I heard a comment on how sore the front of their thighs were. At first, I thought the voice came from the inner recesses of my head…or the television blaring in the client’s family room. When it dawned on me that the client was actually communicating with me, I snapped out of my zombie mind and asked where they felt the soreness might have stemmed from (activities, diet, etc.) In three minutes, I received more feedback than in all the weeks I had been working with this individual. My crappy massage was this person’s saving grace. I know now to start off in a general way with said individual and allow them to lead me where they need. This problem turned out to be a model – a learning experience to challenge my approach to different personality types. Sometimes the egg can be cracked without too much force or effort. Take that, brain!!

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That’s Rolfed Up

Realigning your internal framework a la Rolf!

During the mid-point of my massage education, one of my professors described a technique known as Structural Integration. Falling under the alternative medicine umbrella, structural integration aims to put the body back into proper alignment by manipulating connective tissue (i.e. fascia) to release areas of restriction based on how the client has been moving and holding their body in space. This manipulation is done to affect the deepest level of the musculo-skeletal system (we are talking right down to the nerves) which might feel quite intense in the moment, but over time can reduce pain caused by improper movement patterns. In tandem with the work, the client is re-educated in how to move properly in order to maintain the results of the treatment.

One of the most popular modalities of structural integration is Rolfing. I was familiarized with this when a close friend, who suffered traumatic injuries from an accident, received this bodywork along with her physical therapy. She went from being unable to walk all the way to full on modern dancing within a year. I recall her saying it hurt – A LOT. Intrigued, I did some research to see what it entailed. Created by biochemist Dr. Ida P. Rolf, who recognized that the body’s systems were all interconnected through a seamless network of connective tissues, it was originally meant for the chronically disabled to help improve their mobility. However, she soon learned that her method of postural release also applied to people with chronic pain, stress and/or who put intense physical demand on their bodies. Hmm…sounds like somebody familiar, e?

Like any effective form of bodywork, Rolfing is a holistic approach, taking into consideration the individual and what their needs might be to adjust the treatment accordingly. Adjustment is key also in the depth of manipulation of their connective tissues as well as the mobilization of their joints. Some of us, although mentally psyched for it, find that our bodies will fight back. As a therapist, you have to know how to knock on the door in order to be invited into a particular area of the body. The client needs to feel safe, comfortable and trusting of your touch, especially when the work will be painful. The end goal is free and fluid movement. Usually this will be done in 10 sessions; however some people feel very dramatic changes to their posture and movement right after their first session. (See the diagram I posted in the header for an idea of what happens)

Now that the benefits and technique have been laid out for you, there is the task of finding and working with the right Rolfer. A therapist cannot claim they Rolf unless they have been Certified by The Rolf Institute of Structural Integration, the only organization worldwide that educates and certifies Rolfers. You can search for and check a therapist’s credentials via the Institute’s website Verification link. Certification aside, a therapist’s approach can and will vary. It is important to find a practitioner that communicates effectively and listens to your feedback in a constructive manner. Another friend of mine received the technique and found that her therapist would not ask her questions or address her comments regarding the work. She left the experience feeling she was treated like a body, not a whole person. That is never a good thing in any form of bodywork and usually does not produce results. If you are open to being Rolfed, take the time to research your practitioner and/or get referrals from those who have been privy to this treatment. Dramatic change is priceless.

For more information on the latest in Rolf techniques and research:

http://www.rolfresearchfoundation.org

Premenstrual fitness

I never miss a training day. My exercise schedule is rigid; conducted with a NO EXCUSES attitude. That is how I roll. No one has to cajole me out of bed, push me out of the house or leave threatening messages on my phone to scare me into fitness. When it comes to exercise, I have always been self-motivated. Twice a week, I do a combination of High Intensity Interval Training (HIIT) and strength/weight training with my trainer. Another two days of the week, I do some form of cardio mixed with cross fit and strength band/weight training on my own, either at home or at the gym. Everyday of the week, I manage to fit in at least 45 minutes to an hour of walking, stair climbing or overall hustling intermingled with my work as a massage therapist, which is a tremendous core strength builder. It’s fair to say that I’m tired by the end of my day, but the only time I truly feel the affects of all my activities is the few days prior to my period known as premenstrual syndrome or PMS for short. To say I am pooped would be an understatement. My body feels like it is made of lead. My balance and coordination are a joke; I can barely do a one legged squat without tipping over, which my trainer finds highly entertaining being that I have that martial arts/dance background and what not. My nutrition becomes spotty, as I crave the saltiest of salty and chocolatey of chocolate things, but get so nauseated that I end up eating less than what my body needs. Worst of all these symptoms is my emotional state, which fluctuates from absolute rage to bottom of my soul sadness. The former makes me want to break someone’s face and the latter, like I am falling to pieces mid-workout.

Training like a Spartan may not be the intuitive thing to do.

The 7 to 10 days prior to the arrival of the menstrual cycle and the first two days of the cycle itself can be unbearable for many women. Men can make all the snide comments and PMS jokes in the world; however hormones are powerful movers and shakers of a body’s state of balance a.k.a. homeostasis. These chemical messengers regulate many functions and processes; too little or too much of a particular hormone and things go haywire. Take for example human growth hormone, which ensures our bones, muscles and tissues grow us into adulthood and beyond. Having an over production causes Gigantism, where a person will grow to heights above 7 foot. Having too little will cause Dwarfism, a condition where a person is extremely short (well under 4′ 10″) with proportional body parts. With respect to PMS, it is the shifting of estrogen and progesterone that cause its symptoms and determine how acutely one experiences them. My clumsiness (aforementioned falling over during my workout), low tolerance for noises (I can’t take it when weighted plates and dumbbells get dropped after people finish their sets), difficulty concentrating/confusion (no, no you meant my other “left”), fatigue (lead body), aggressive behavior (god bless boxing and muay thai) and craving for excessive sleep are all symptoms that challenge my ability to workout and work effectively. Rather than ignore and try to push through, I found that I had to modify my definition of what would be effective fitness for this period of time (pun unintentional).

I loved Xena, my pseudo Greek warrior princess!

While sparring relieved some of the aggression I felt, trying to take someone’s head off left me vulnerable to shoulder injury. Hence, know when to use 20% of your strength and when to go full on. Instead of taking a 4 second break between sets, I grab my water bottle more often and take the time to breath through whatever meltdown I am feeling coming on; therefore getting it out of my system before continuing.  Again, I am avoiding injuring myself by pushing my body, but without sacrificing the level of workout I have set out to do. I also found that increasing my cardio (i.e. aerobic exercise) during this time helped me to get my appetite in check and jump-start my cycle without as much muscular cramping as I felt when I did more strength training and aggressive exercise. Since every body is different, it is super important to pay attention to what your symptoms are telling you and then, try modifying your activities to see what works for you. Ultimately, PMS should not be a reason to shy away from fitness. If anything, it will help put those hormones back in their bloody place (that one was intentional 🙂 ) per the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists.

Need a Day Off? Recovery and Motivation

I have been feeling a familiar pulling sensation in my coracobrachialis (a lovely muscle found in the region of your bicep that feels kinda hard and ropey at times). This was exactly what I felt before I developed that horrendous tendinitis 2 years ago that had me altering not only my workouts, but the way I massaged so that I could actually have a livelihood.

Need a Day Off? Recovery and Motivation
The bain of my ever-loving training life...

 

The below post by Eirik Førlie, owner and coach at Forlie Sports Performance Gym, sheds some light on “rest days” of which I definitely do not take enough of. My body is trying to tell me something and Eirik is making me feel like it’s safe to listen.

Need a Day Off? Recovery and Motivation.

Where my hands may fail me: Massage by Foot

In my waking life, I do a hell of a lot with my body, especially my hands. From clutching weights, punching pads or carrying my massage table around, my hands and upper body really serve me well. Factor in 15 to 20 hours of hands on massage per week and those are some busy hands indeed. Sometimes I wonder what I would do if something happened to my arms. Last year, when I was recovering from my supraspinatus injury, every day of massage was followed by an immense amount of stretching and icing of my tendon. I worked through it; however it gave me a sneak peak into just how over my career would be if I injured myself permanently. So many therapists leave the profession prematurely due to musculoskeletal injuries resulting from overwork, poor body mechanics and poor self care, to name a few. I love what I do, but much like my voice defines me as a singer, my hands, forearms and elbows define me as a massage therapist. They are my tools of the trade.  Without them, I am useless…or so I thought.

Take a look at the inspiration that is UK massage therapist, Sue Kent:

Sue was born with a deformity of her upper extremities rendering her hands useless for massage. Her feet are her tools, which she has trained to such a level over the past 7 years of practice that she is now an official therapist to the Paralympics of 2012 in London. She also rows, skis, swims, sails and runs. Her specialty is sports massage, which from experience requires precision, deep pressure and specificity. I’m totally awestruck that she has trained her feet to achieve these three requirements. Below is a video of her technique in action. I am truly amazed by the strength of her feet and the way she uses her big toes and heels to access muscles.

It’s people like Sue who show me that you can always find a way to make what you are passionate about a reality. At least I know that where my hands may fail me, I can always look to my feet.

More Info on Sue Kent here:

http://www.enjoyfeet.co.uk/Sue_Kent.html

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-wales-south-west-wales-16672120