Bringing Balance One Adjustment At A Time

Outside of spa work and my private clientele, I also provide massage at a Wellness Center in midtown. This little den of health offers chiropractic care, massage therapy, holistic health & nutritional counseling and postural exercise. The approach is corrective and the result is a stronger, pain free and more erect version of your former self.  In order to understand fully what the corrective approach entails, one must first comprehend what chiropractic care is. Many people hear the term Chiropractor and immediately shudder. Images of having one’s head placed at odd angles for the “cracking” of bones turns the fear-o-meter up high. Worse yet, is the notion of chiropractor as being a fake doctor, sadly due to the gads of crooks that run insurance scams and give the profession its bad rep. I recall being eleven years old and walking past this man in the street with a little skeleton propped on a table advertising a Chiropractor’s office. Five years later, when my mother had a car accident and was advised to get chiropractic adjustment for her case, into that same office we went. During each visit the doctor did the same thing to her back and neck , which left my mother feeling much better than she went in. However, within a few days, the pain and stiffness would return. When she had brought this up to the chiropractor, he told her that she would need chiropractic adjustment for the rest of her life if she wanted to remain pain free. This sounded unfathomable to my mother and once her case was settled out of court, she stopped going.

What that chiropractor told my mother would only be true IF the approach was not corrective. His care consisted of giving people quick fixes for their pain, so they would keep coming back. This is no different than popping a pill. It is not dealing with the root issue(s). The body is comprised of superficial and deep layers of muscle all covered by connective tissue. When a joint is misaligned, say in the vertebrae of your back for example, then the muscles surrounding that joint try to stabilize it and protect its position, even if it causes them to function improperly. They are like the dutiful bodyguards of a volatile criminal – the more they support his activities, the more they plunge themselves toward certain destruction. I know I am making a rather “dramatic” analogy here; however, this is serious stuff. No one should be okay with being in chronic pain and having limitations in their mobility and life activities. When the joint is adjusted which is basically giving it a little help to go back into its proper position, not “cracking” as we all like to refer to it, the muscles can let go. Depending on the individual’s condition, the muscles might have a hard time settling into their new normal, which is why massage pre and post adjustment really helps to flood them with the nutrients and support they need to move in their proper way. Take a look at the videos below where both doctors explain the corrective approach and especially the client testimonials, some of which were in dire physical straits when they first came in.

and client testimonial

I’m really lucky to be able to work with this group of medical professionals and it has taught me so much about a comprehensive approach. We all work as a team, consulting one another to find the best way to bring a client/patient’s body back into balance. If you are within the NYC limits and dealing with chronic pain resulting from an injury, lifestyle or some unknown factor, definitely make it a priority to visit the office, where you will get a complimentary spinal screening, along with adjustment and report of findings to let you know what is going on underneath those layers and what your treatment options could be. Everything in its proper place, starting from the inside out.

BIBC team candid Jan 2014
Our little wellness family 🙂

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That’s Rolfed Up

Realigning your internal framework a la Rolf!

During the mid-point of my massage education, one of my professors described a technique known as Structural Integration. Falling under the alternative medicine umbrella, structural integration aims to put the body back into proper alignment by manipulating connective tissue (i.e. fascia) to release areas of restriction based on how the client has been moving and holding their body in space. This manipulation is done to affect the deepest level of the musculo-skeletal system (we are talking right down to the nerves) which might feel quite intense in the moment, but over time can reduce pain caused by improper movement patterns. In tandem with the work, the client is re-educated in how to move properly in order to maintain the results of the treatment.

One of the most popular modalities of structural integration is Rolfing. I was familiarized with this when a close friend, who suffered traumatic injuries from an accident, received this bodywork along with her physical therapy. She went from being unable to walk all the way to full on modern dancing within a year. I recall her saying it hurt – A LOT. Intrigued, I did some research to see what it entailed. Created by biochemist Dr. Ida P. Rolf, who recognized that the body’s systems were all interconnected through a seamless network of connective tissues, it was originally meant for the chronically disabled to help improve their mobility. However, she soon learned that her method of postural release also applied to people with chronic pain, stress and/or who put intense physical demand on their bodies. Hmm…sounds like somebody familiar, e?

Like any effective form of bodywork, Rolfing is a holistic approach, taking into consideration the individual and what their needs might be to adjust the treatment accordingly. Adjustment is key also in the depth of manipulation of their connective tissues as well as the mobilization of their joints. Some of us, although mentally psyched for it, find that our bodies will fight back. As a therapist, you have to know how to knock on the door in order to be invited into a particular area of the body. The client needs to feel safe, comfortable and trusting of your touch, especially when the work will be painful. The end goal is free and fluid movement. Usually this will be done in 10 sessions; however some people feel very dramatic changes to their posture and movement right after their first session. (See the diagram I posted in the header for an idea of what happens)

Now that the benefits and technique have been laid out for you, there is the task of finding and working with the right Rolfer. A therapist cannot claim they Rolf unless they have been Certified by The Rolf Institute of Structural Integration, the only organization worldwide that educates and certifies Rolfers. You can search for and check a therapist’s credentials via the Institute’s website Verification link. Certification aside, a therapist’s approach can and will vary. It is important to find a practitioner that communicates effectively and listens to your feedback in a constructive manner. Another friend of mine received the technique and found that her therapist would not ask her questions or address her comments regarding the work. She left the experience feeling she was treated like a body, not a whole person. That is never a good thing in any form of bodywork and usually does not produce results. If you are open to being Rolfed, take the time to research your practitioner and/or get referrals from those who have been privy to this treatment. Dramatic change is priceless.

For more information on the latest in Rolf techniques and research:

http://www.rolfresearchfoundation.org

Trigger Points – the baggage our muscles hide!

Is this your back?

If the above image gives you the impression that a group of assassins  are ready to fire on you, stay with that feeling.  No one is immune. They hide in your muscles and sinews waiting for something or someone to activate them. Some gather in groups while others migrate to new territory, but more often than not they refer their pain elsewhere to trick you. They are trigger points.

A trigger point is defined as a hyper irritable spot within a taut band of skeletal muscle that elicits pain locally when compressed, but can also refer it elsewhere or be accompanied by muscle spasm. When touched, these spots can feel like hard nodules ( i.e. the “knots” we so often refer to in our backs and other body parts). It was Dr. Janet Travel, physician to the late president John F. Kennedy, that first came up with the term when she noticed that these points of pain tended to happen in predictable patterns that could be mapped out on the body. Her maps can be found in the 2 Volume book she wrote with David G. Simons, “Myofascial Pain and Dysfunction: The Trigger Point Manual.”

How do you know if you have one or more of these bad boys lurking in your tissues? There are a few characteristic symptoms which include sensitivity to pressure in a muscle, stiffness accompanied sometimes with a pulling sensation emanating from a particular point in the muscle, pain that refers from the point compressed to another area of the body and pain that has a dull, aching or burning quality to it.  Other symptoms sometimes experienced are various autonomic phenomena like dizziness, sweating and fever as well as headaches, numbness, loss of range of motion and dysfunction of the muscle involved. While the cause of trigger points remains a much disputed medical topic, it is safe to say that they most commonly occur when muscles are chronically overloaded, as in the case with occupational and exercise overuse, injury and poor posture. Also, chilling of a muscle (i.e. catching a draft or having an air-conditioner blow on you) and the position in which you sleep can also create these points. Sometimes these points are even triggered by emotional and stress related events.

Any qualified massage therapist (ME!) possesses the skills needed to deactivate these points and treat the surrounding tissues. In my opinion, your first course of action should be massage therapy. Thereafter, if the points do not resolve within a few treatment sessions, you should be referred to a chiropractor, osteopath or physical therapist, all of whom employ more aggressive treatment measures. The protocol used to address trigger points via massage is a combination of sustained compression of the point followed by cross fiber friction and deep strokes in the direction of the muscle fibers to clear out metabolic wastes and encourage the flow of blood into the affected area. I am a huge fan of a myofascial technique known as skin rolling. It literally involves me picking up your skin and rolling it along different angles between my fingers, almost like cookie dough. This is an important diagnostic tool for me to find these stuck points, especially if a client is unsure of the location of their discomfort. The sustained compression of these points temporarily stops the pain signal coming from the brain and the flow of blood to the area, so that when it is released, blood literally floods the point and washes wastes away. The first compression is always the worst because the pain level will be greatest then. It is super important to breathe through the 8-10 second count, as the point is held. On a scale of 1 to 10, the pain/discomfort should be around an 8. With each subsequent sustained compression (about 4 in total) the pain level will dissipate while the force of compression stays about the same. During these compressions, many clients will break into a sweat or become hyperemic (flushed) in the area of the trigger point. Sometimes there are twitches in the muscle or surrounding tissues near the point being worked on. Even stranger, the point can move while I am compressing and I literally have to chase it through its migratory path until I shut it down. Once the compressions are finished, the point is rubbed vigorously in a cross fiber pattern between 1 to 5 minutes and then all the fibers of the muscle get treated to a nice and slow, deep rub down. I like to then apply a bit of heat in the form of a heated dry towel (no more than 10-15 mins on) or a topical irritant like Tiger Balm.

Best case scenario, trigger points will get resolved in one intense session, but more often than not, multiple sessions are needed to deactivate years of evil. It’s extremely important to assess what is going on or has happened in your life, both physically and emotionally that, although your brain might have dismissed, your muscles and tissues beg you to notice. This awareness will help you focus your attention back onto yourself and deal with the baggage at hand because trust me, your muscles have better, more productive things to do than carry the weight of the world in their nooks and crannies.

Additional reference available at:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Trigger_point

NOTE **Read personal trainer, running coach and kayak instructor, Jeanne Andrus’s post about her experience with Trigger Points. I think it to be a helpful read:

Trigger Points