Premenstrual fitness

I never miss a training day. My exercise schedule is rigid; conducted with a NO EXCUSES attitude. That is how I roll. No one has to cajole me out of bed, push me out of the house or leave threatening messages on my phone to scare me into fitness. When it comes to exercise, I have always been self-motivated. Twice a week, I do a combination of High Intensity Interval Training (HIIT) and strength/weight training with my trainer. Another two days of the week, I do some form of cardio mixed with cross fit and strength band/weight training on my own, either at home or at the gym. Everyday of the week, I manage to fit in at least 45 minutes to an hour of walking, stair climbing or overall hustling intermingled with my work as a massage therapist, which is a tremendous core strength builder. It’s fair to say that I’m tired by the end of my day, but the only time I truly feel the affects of all my activities is the few days prior to my period known as premenstrual syndrome or PMS for short. To say I am pooped would be an understatement. My body feels like it is made of lead. My balance and coordination are a joke; I can barely do a one legged squat without tipping over, which my trainer finds highly entertaining being that I have that martial arts/dance background and what not. My nutrition becomes spotty, as I crave the saltiest of salty and chocolatey of chocolate things, but get so nauseated that I end up eating less than what my body needs. Worst of all these symptoms is my emotional state, which fluctuates from absolute rage to bottom of my soul sadness. The former makes me want to break someone’s face and the latter, like I am falling to pieces mid-workout.

Training like a Spartan may not be the intuitive thing to do.

The 7 to 10 days prior to the arrival of the menstrual cycle and the first two days of the cycle itself can be unbearable for many women. Men can make all the snide comments and PMS jokes in the world; however hormones are powerful movers and shakers of a body’s state of balance a.k.a. homeostasis. These chemical messengers regulate many functions and processes; too little or too much of a particular hormone and things go haywire. Take for example human growth hormone, which ensures our bones, muscles and tissues grow us into adulthood and beyond. Having an over production causes Gigantism, where a person will grow to heights above 7 foot. Having too little will cause Dwarfism, a condition where a person is extremely short (well under 4′ 10″) with proportional body parts. With respect to PMS, it is the shifting of estrogen and progesterone that cause its symptoms and determine how acutely one experiences them. My clumsiness (aforementioned falling over during my workout), low tolerance for noises (I can’t take it when weighted plates and dumbbells get dropped after people finish their sets), difficulty concentrating/confusion (no, no you meant my other “left”), fatigue (lead body), aggressive behavior (god bless boxing and muay thai) and craving for excessive sleep are all symptoms that challenge my ability to workout and work effectively. Rather than ignore and try to push through, I found that I had to modify my definition of what would be effective fitness for this period of time (pun unintentional).

I loved Xena, my pseudo Greek warrior princess!

While sparring relieved some of the aggression I felt, trying to take someone’s head off left me vulnerable to shoulder injury. Hence, know when to use 20% of your strength and when to go full on. Instead of taking a 4 second break between sets, I grab my water bottle more often and take the time to breath through whatever meltdown I am feeling coming on; therefore getting it out of my system before continuing.  Again, I am avoiding injuring myself by pushing my body, but without sacrificing the level of workout I have set out to do. I also found that increasing my cardio (i.e. aerobic exercise) during this time helped me to get my appetite in check and jump-start my cycle without as much muscular cramping as I felt when I did more strength training and aggressive exercise. Since every body is different, it is super important to pay attention to what your symptoms are telling you and then, try modifying your activities to see what works for you. Ultimately, PMS should not be a reason to shy away from fitness. If anything, it will help put those hormones back in their bloody place (that one was intentional 🙂 ) per the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists.

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Psychological Stress and Cancer – Px Massage

Pathology is one of the required courses within the Massage Therapy Program at The Swedish Institute. Among the many conditions broken down for the soon to be therapist and then related back to massage is cancer. Within our notes and lectures, there is a working list of “irritants” that can create the level of genetic damage needed to allow cells to grow out of control and change their state. The usual suspects are present: smoking, alcoholism, environmental pollutants, genetic factors, viruses like HPV/AIDS and free radicals to name a few. The usefulness of massage to the cancer patient is in helping them to better deal with the side effects of chemo/radiation therapies, reduce the anxiety surrounding having this illness and boost the energetic force of the body. Reflexology and Acupressure massage like Shiatsu are the recommended types of bodywork to address the weakened systems of the body and specific organs without “spreading” the cancer around. These techniques also sufficiently relax the patient, thus stimulating their parasympathetic nervous response (rest and digest) which then gives them an appetite to ingest nutrients necessary to boost their immune system. The other useful arena for massage is in stress reduction and energetic support for the caretakers and family members of those who have the disease.

As cancer has now struck close to home, I have been doing a lot more research on alternative and natural therapies for the condition. In my search, I came across an article detailing the story of a German oncologist in the 1970’s by the name of Dr. Hamer who felt so strongly that there was a connection between psychological stress and the formation of Cancer, that he conducted over 40,000 case studies using MRI’s to prove his theory. What he saw were lesions created in the brain from the stress/trauma that he felt sent signals to corresponding body cells that caused the formation of tumors and the destruction of healthy tissue. He noted that if the source of the psychological stress could be alleviated or the individual be given strategies to better cope with psychologically traumatic events, then the stress on the body would be reduced significantly if not eradicated. When combined with conventional treatment for cancer, he felt that patients had a better chance of fighting the disease into permanent remission. Although there was a lot of controversy surrounding  his theory, years later there is a lot to be said for the effects of stress on the immune system.

What is so amazing about bodywork is that it is an extremely effective method of stress reduction that is both easily accessible and affordable. As Ben Franklin’s idiom states, “An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure.” Receiving regular massage promotes that state of balance our health thrives in known as homeostasis. With so much going on in the world around us so outside of our control, the best thing we can do for ourselves is dedicate the time to lay still and hopefully, let go.

SOURCES:

http://www.cancer-prevention.net/