Integrative Medicine, Massage Techniques Explained

Jury rigged

One of the most valuable skills anyone can possess is the ability to temporarily fix things with whatever is available to you in the moment. There was a whole television series in the 80’s based on this skill, which I watched religiously. “MacGyver” was the perfect mixture of adventure and science to my young little mind and Richard Dean Anderson was so, so believable in his role. He cracked eggs from a chicken coup in South America over his car radiator to stop its leaking, so he could drive and escape the bad guys. Turned a coffin he was placed in, into a makeshift jet ski to escape “za Germans” — my hero!

MacGyver at work!

In classic American fashion, we use the term jerry rig to denote a patch job or temporary construction, which is incorrect. The proper term is jury rig, which is a nautical term stemming from makeshift masts and yards made in case of damage or the loss of the original mast. It’s a weak and temporary method; basically enough to help you steer your ship into the nearest port and get properly fixed. Same idea applies in everyday life. Jury rigged problems buy you time, but end up being a lot worse down the line if they aren’t addressed sooner than later.

In these precarious economic times, it’s understandable that jury rigging may be the only manner in which to address issues. However, keep in mind that a home is only as strong as its foundation. If the leg of your massage table is starting to come loose, it’s only a matter of time before the putty you used to secure it wears off and your client ends up on the floor. It may be worth investing in a new table. Believe it or not, there are affordable options out there, if you take the time to look. $108 dollars spent is better than a lawsuit. With respect to injury, trying to work through the pain of muscle spasms in your back by jury rigging your office chair is only going to get you out of work faster than if you take a personal day to get a massage, see the chiropractor and/or doctor to deal with it. Energetically speaking, if everything in your life is a patch job, you can never really move forward. Eastern theory indicates that the inability to think, plan and execute relates to the Liver and Gallbladder being out of balance.  They present with the following symptoms: muscular weakness in the limbs and back, irritability, sudden bursts of anger, migraines, indigestion, sinus issues and depression to name a few. For a more comprehensive list of symptoms, pick up a copy of Korngold’s “Between Heaven and Earth: A Guide To Chinese Medicine.” Acupuncture and Shiatsu massage both effectively address this type of imbalance and your practitioner can give you aftercare in the way of dietary modifications and stretches to support the work they have done. This is especially good if you cannot afford to do more than a few sessions. Life is too short and precious to be jury rigged. Do all that you can to permanently fix your problems, internally and externally.

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Integrative Medicine, Massage Techniques Explained

The Energetics of Making Baby

This is an addendum to my previous post about Fertility Massage.

Keeping that bun in its oven is harder than most people think!

Chinese medicine teaches that in order for a woman to conceive and maintain a pregnancy, a combination of organs need to work in harmony. Any weakness in either one or all of these organs makes baby making all that much harder, if not impossible. However, unlike the fertility treatments of the Western medical world, the Eastern approach is much more cost effective, easily accessed and non-invasive. One of these approaches is the acupressure massage known as Shiatsu, which is performed by yours truly and a host of massage therapists in this hemisphere of the world.

Much like acupuncture, acupressure massage addresses specific points along meridians that form pathways of energy or Qi (Chi). These pathways correspond to twelve vital organs in the body, as defined by Chinese medicine. The organs, represented by their meridians, serve a particular physiological and spiritual function. Any state of disease or imbalance can be explained by either an excess or a deficiency. In order to understand how Shiatsu can help with fertility and beyond, here is a brief overview of the energetics of making baby.

One word – JING. This is your life force; the Qi that you have stored up from birth given to you by both parents. The organ responsible for storing this prenatal energy reserve is the Kidney. As we age, our JING begins to deplete naturally, but those who live hard and abuse their bodies deplete it faster. In general, any lifestyle or chronic condition that taxes your body, depletes your life force. When a person dies, the Chinese say it is because their JING has run out. Hence, when a woman has a depleted or weak JING, there is simply not enough to provide for the prenatal Qi necessary to conceive a baby. If she is able to conceive, JING is necessary to consolidate the pregnancy; therefore, the fertilized egg would have trouble planting itself in place.

Speaking of baby staying in place, the womb-home needs to be in tip top shape and position in order for the fetus to develop and grow those 9 months. The organ that is responsible for holding things in their proper form is the Spleen. The additional role of this organ, according to Chinese medicine, is to create blood. The walls of the womb are a dense network of bloody tissue (i.e. the placenta) which both cushions the fetus and feeds it by way of the umbilical chord. If the Spleen is weak, the womb and food source will be compromised making a miscarriage all that more likely.

While the baby develops physically, it is necessary for it to also do so spiritually. The baby’s consciousness comes from the Heart, the organ responsible for housing the spiritual soul. The Chinese believe that the soul comes into the body on the 81st day of life, which would be around the tail end of the 1st trimester. If we take Judeo-Christian debate out of this, essentially the first trimester is almost like a trial period; make it out of that third month and your risk of miscarriage drops significantly. I found that most women I know were reluctant to announce their pregnancies until they were out of their 1st trimester, so as not to “jinx” them. This mentality is rooted in medical fact. Miscarriage is the most common type of pregnancy loss, according to the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG) with most occurring within the first 13 weeks of pregnancy. (http://www.americanpregnancy.org)

Lastly, pregnancy can be very stressful on the body. Not only does blood and nourishment need to flow freely to the developing baby, but the musculo-skeletal system of the mother needs to be able to adapt to its growth. The Liver is the organ the Chinese say governs the muscles and sinews of the body. It regulates the flow of blood/Qi to wherever it is needed, as it is needed. The ever changing state that is pregnancy demands a lot of the Liver. Therefore, this organ needs to be kept strong. A difficult pregnancy (i.e. limited mobility, muscular insufficiency, structural deformities, etc.) and even more difficult delivery are usually associated with weakness in the Liver.

Unlike other forms of massage, Shiatsu is performed with the client clothed in comfortable attire that does not restrict movement. The work can occur on either a mat or a table, depending on the client’s comfort and needs. The main goal is to tonify or strengthen the above organs involved in conception, maintenance of pregnancy and the health of the mother. Should you have a history of infertility and/or chronic miscarriage, the Spleen and Kidney would be the main focus of treatment. Their pathways of energy run along the lower limbs. So does that of the Liver. To tonify, the therapist would likely employ slow, deep and broad pressure to these points along with various stretches to unblock any stuck energy. Of course, each session would be customized to the client based on a detailed assessment and re-evaluation post treatment. The price range for a Shiatsu session varies depending on where you live, but expect that most will be priced between $65 and $120 US for a 60 min session. If this seems like a lot, know that many practitioners provide packages at a discounted rate or sometimes even sliding scale. In addition, many schools of acupuncture and massage have student clinics where treatment is offered at a heavily discounted rate. There is an application process involved and sometimes there can be a waiting list, but once you are accepted into the clinic, the quality of treatment is held to a super high standard. Students have to keep detailed records and write treatment plans, all the while consulting with supervisors on client cases. This option is a great learning experience for them and a cost effective opportunity for you.

 

 

 

Integrative Medicine, Massage Techniques Explained

Champissage – from your head down to your toes!

Way back when I was a little girl, I used to rub my father’s head in order to help him fall asleep – an early sign of my eventual path into massage therapy, I’m sure. This task was requested of all family members, but I was the only one with the patience to do it. I would mindlessly play with his hair until his tensions were chased away by slumber. Little did I know what a therapeutic thing I was truly doing for him.

In my massage practice, one of my favorite ways to end a session is with a scalp massage. I usually put a few drops of conditioning oil in my hands and then proceed to cover the circumference of the head with rhythmic strokes until the entire scalp has been moisturized. Most clients either fall asleep or zone out to the verge of sleepiness by the time I finish. I do this both to relax them and give their hair a little TLC. I never learned a specific protocol for addressing the scalp. I just kind of did what felt natural and what related to a client’s condition, if they had one.

In India, head massage is a way of life. Practiced for thousands of years, it is not only an integral part of the Indian woman’s grooming ritual, but also an alternative medicinal treatment for many conditions, as outlined in ancient Ayurvedic texts. It was brought to the west in 1973 by osteopath and massage therapist, Narendra Mehta, who felt there was a gap in the full body massage that soothing head massage could fill. Dubbing it champissage, a blend of the indian word for “head” and massage, he opened a school in London and has now made this the top complimentary technique practiced amongst therapists in the UK. The certification course is just four days long and teaches how to properly address the shoulders, upper arms, neck, scalp, face and ears to reduce stress and flush out the buildup of energetic debris that affect one’s health and well being.

The interesting thing about champissage is its ability to be a stand alone treatment, sans the full body massage. The way the course is structured, therapists learn how to address the shoulders, upper arms, neck, scalp, face and ears with massage and energetic balancing techniques based on Chakra energy. A chakra is a channel of energy that follows a central path down the body starting from the crown of one’s head and ending at the base of the spine.  Each chakra branches off in the form of “petals” that distribute their energy through the body. The zones addressed through champissage encompass 3 chakras – the crown, the brow and the throat. Each has a profound energetic representation that makes it clear to me why just performing a champissage can feel like the entire body is addressed.

The Crown chakra or Sahasrara is considered the chakra of pure consciousness. Its role is like that of the pituitary gland, which sits on its own little crown deep within the skull and regulates the body’s functions through the release of hormones via the Endocrine system and communicates with the Central Nervous System via the hypothalamus. This chakra relates to physical action with a sense of cause and affect otherwise known as karma, mental action with respect to a sense of unity and belonging to the collective universe and emotional action through a sense of experiencing another person’s experience as if you were inside them, being them.

The Brow chakra or Ajna is also known as the third eye. It’s role can be correlated  to the function of the pineal gland, which is a light sensitive gland that produces a hormone, melatonin, that regulates sleep and wakefulness. Keeping with this concept of light and dark balance, this chakra balances the higher and lower selves. It also fosters trusting inner guidance through the access of intuition. Mentally, it deals with visual consciousness and emotionally, clarity on an intuitive level.

The Throat chakra or Vishuddha relates to communication and growth through expression. This chakra is paralleled to the thyroid gland, which is located in the throat and responsible for producing hormones that regulate growth and maturation. Physically, it governs communication, emotionally independence, mentally fluent thought and spiritually, it governs a sense of security. It is associated with the upper extremities; therefore addressing this chakra affects the neck, arms and hands.

Western therapists who have learned and received champissage describe a sense of mental and physical clarity post-massage, along with an increase in mobility and reduction in tension. It makes sense when these above 3 chakras are so integral to one’s sense of self and relationship to things outside of one’s body on spiritual, emotional and mental levels. I recall when learning the neck muscles in school, our instructor cautioned that for many people the throat and face could access all kinds of emotional triggers from past traumas and experiences. That is why it became so important to foster a sense of safety and trust with the client, so that they would know it would be okay to let go, no matter what feelings bubbled up to the surface during the work. A slow buildup is the recommended protocol for energetic balancing with respect to champissage. In this way, the client can trust in the touch and be prepared for the deeper strokes that come toward the end of the massage.

Although many spas in the U.S. are starting to offer this form of massage under various marketing monikers, its therapeutic value should not be dismissed. Whether you are receiving champissage at the day spa or in the offices of a licensed practitioner, the affects are still profoundly therapeutic.

SOURCES:

http://www.massagemag.com/spa/treatment/indianhead.php

http://www.champissageinternational.com/

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chakra

Illness and Conditions

Psychological Stress and Cancer – Px Massage

Pathology is one of the required courses within the Massage Therapy Program at The Swedish Institute. Among the many conditions broken down for the soon to be therapist and then related back to massage is cancer. Within our notes and lectures, there is a working list of “irritants” that can create the level of genetic damage needed to allow cells to grow out of control and change their state. The usual suspects are present: smoking, alcoholism, environmental pollutants, genetic factors, viruses like HPV/AIDS and free radicals to name a few. The usefulness of massage to the cancer patient is in helping them to better deal with the side effects of chemo/radiation therapies, reduce the anxiety surrounding having this illness and boost the energetic force of the body. Reflexology and Acupressure massage like Shiatsu are the recommended types of bodywork to address the weakened systems of the body and specific organs without “spreading” the cancer around. These techniques also sufficiently relax the patient, thus stimulating their parasympathetic nervous response (rest and digest) which then gives them an appetite to ingest nutrients necessary to boost their immune system. The other useful arena for massage is in stress reduction and energetic support for the caretakers and family members of those who have the disease.

As cancer has now struck close to home, I have been doing a lot more research on alternative and natural therapies for the condition. In my search, I came across an article detailing the story of a German oncologist in the 1970’s by the name of Dr. Hamer who felt so strongly that there was a connection between psychological stress and the formation of Cancer, that he conducted over 40,000 case studies using MRI’s to prove his theory. What he saw were lesions created in the brain from the stress/trauma that he felt sent signals to corresponding body cells that caused the formation of tumors and the destruction of healthy tissue. He noted that if the source of the psychological stress could be alleviated or the individual be given strategies to better cope with psychologically traumatic events, then the stress on the body would be reduced significantly if not eradicated. When combined with conventional treatment for cancer, he felt that patients had a better chance of fighting the disease into permanent remission. Although there was a lot of controversy surrounding  his theory, years later there is a lot to be said for the effects of stress on the immune system.

What is so amazing about bodywork is that it is an extremely effective method of stress reduction that is both easily accessible and affordable. As Ben Franklin’s idiom states, “An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure.” Receiving regular massage promotes that state of balance our health thrives in known as homeostasis. With so much going on in the world around us so outside of our control, the best thing we can do for ourselves is dedicate the time to lay still and hopefully, let go.

SOURCES:

http://www.cancer-prevention.net/