It’s a matter of choice

Male or female?

When given the choice between a male or female therapist, which would you prefer? There are definitely many factors that play a role in this decision, including your gender, sexual orientation, religious and/or cultural mores and presumed stereotypes to name a few. Although ideally it should be an equal opportunity booking system, ultimately you want to book with someone you feel comfortable with. More often than not, the therapist that fits that bill ends up being female.

While still in school, I remember becoming very anxious about my ability to find work upon graduation. I consulted with one of my teachers, who happened to be male. I was hoping he could advise me on where it would be best to apply and what potential employers were looking for in a “rookie” therapist. Keep in mind that this teacher had a successful private practice, had been a lead therapist/supervisor at a very popular gym/spa chain and super active member of various professional groups related to massage in addition to his position as a core member of the faculty. Despite all this experience, he told me that it had been very difficult for him to obtain clients. He had to work twice as hard as the female therapists to strum up business and eventually reach the level of success he had. His skills and expertise were not the deciding factor; it was his gender that put him at a disadvantage.

Think about the power differential. The client laying on the table is in the most vulnerable state. You are unclothed and in a submissive position. You trust that the therapist towering over you has the education and skills to address your needs properly and respectfully. You hope that they don’t judge you or your body in any way. You pray their touch is firm, focused and has a flow. You want them to put you at ease from the start, so that you can mentally check out and really enjoy the benefits of the work. Regardless of gender, a true professional will be able to provide all of the above to the client, but without a doubt women win out for their perceived nurturing nature, transcending the role of “mommy” on the massage table. A recent article in Psychology Today outlines the gender gap when it comes to caretakers. Society expects women to be the natural choice due to their biology, while men are hardwired to be natural “fixers” and protectors. You might think these qualities would bode well for the male therapist, but not when it comes to massage.

Minus the watch, this is a perfectly normal image of a male therapist working the lumbar region of the back of a male client.

Then there is the tricky area of sexuality. As long as there are “happy ending” jokes circulating and brothels posing as massage parlors, the massage profession will always have to prove its legitimacy. That said, heterosexual men, whether single or married, can feel extreme trepidation at booking with a male therapist because of what other people may assume about their sexuality. Also, since the parasympathetic nervous system is stimulated during massage, an erection could occur and the thoughts of this happening with a male therapist brings on much anxiety. On the other side of the coin, heterosexual women, whether single or married, can feel hesitant to book with a male because of the possibility of an attraction related to their touch or the judgment of their body in a sexual manner. I recall one of my clients telling me she didn’t care if she had shaved her legs or had cellulite dimpling on her thighs with me because “we have the same parts” but if she had gotten a male therapist she would have felt embarrassed. Throw into this mix the complicated and often skewed ways touch could be perceived after a trauma or abuse and again, the female therapist is the “safer” choice.

You may wonder then, how male therapists are ever able to get clients and be successful in this career. There are some stereotypes that work in their favor. With respect to strength, males are definitely viewed as the stronger sex and more capable of delivering deeper work. Even more so if the work is sports specific, as most massage therapists affiliated or employed by sports teams tend to be male. It took many years for Kelly Calabrese to push through these stereotypes and become the first female massage therapist employed by a Major League Baseball Team. All that aside, education and über professional conduct will prove to be the most powerful tools in bridging the gender gap. The more informed the client is about massage and its benefits, about the background of the therapist and their skills through testimonials and reviews, the more likely they will be able to make an informed decision when given the choice of male or female.

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Where my hands may fail me: Massage by Foot

In my waking life, I do a hell of a lot with my body, especially my hands. From clutching weights, punching pads or carrying my massage table around, my hands and upper body really serve me well. Factor in 15 to 20 hours of hands on massage per week and those are some busy hands indeed. Sometimes I wonder what I would do if something happened to my arms. Last year, when I was recovering from my supraspinatus injury, every day of massage was followed by an immense amount of stretching and icing of my tendon. I worked through it; however it gave me a sneak peak into just how over my career would be if I injured myself permanently. So many therapists leave the profession prematurely due to musculoskeletal injuries resulting from overwork, poor body mechanics and poor self care, to name a few. I love what I do, but much like my voice defines me as a singer, my hands, forearms and elbows define me as a massage therapist. They are my tools of the trade.  Without them, I am useless…or so I thought.

Take a look at the inspiration that is UK massage therapist, Sue Kent:

Sue was born with a deformity of her upper extremities rendering her hands useless for massage. Her feet are her tools, which she has trained to such a level over the past 7 years of practice that she is now an official therapist to the Paralympics of 2012 in London. She also rows, skis, swims, sails and runs. Her specialty is sports massage, which from experience requires precision, deep pressure and specificity. I’m totally awestruck that she has trained her feet to achieve these three requirements. Below is a video of her technique in action. I am truly amazed by the strength of her feet and the way she uses her big toes and heels to access muscles.

It’s people like Sue who show me that you can always find a way to make what you are passionate about a reality. At least I know that where my hands may fail me, I can always look to my feet.

More Info on Sue Kent here:

http://www.enjoyfeet.co.uk/Sue_Kent.html

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-wales-south-west-wales-16672120