Illness and Conditions, Integrative Medicine

The Food MD

The American audience has been saturated with advertisements for Pharmaceutical products since the mid-nineties. Whether it’s in print or on the screen, anyone can find a drug to address a multitude of symptoms a la Ray Bradbury’s “Farenheit 451.” Fast forward through the gently spoken side effects and the advice to “consult with your doctor before taking…” and most people presume life will be brighter, happier and glossier when on this drug. Oh, behold how gray propaganda works.

It’s a full body experience, alright!

In response to all these scripts is “The Food Hospital,”a program that airs on the BBC’s Channel 4 and The Cooking Channel here in the States. It explores the science behind using food as medicine. Patients with conditions and/or a variety of symptoms come in, are subject to a battery of scientific tests after which a food regimen is prescribed and monitored by its doctors to see if it can effectively treat them. During their follow up visits, patients and doctors meticulously review how the different foods eaten helped them through hematocrits (i.e. blood tests) and feedback, then compare the statistical results from the prescription drug alternatives. Sometimes the patients have already tried all the drugs on the market for their condition, so the comparison is first hand; however more often than not, the food program has the most profound impact sans side effects.

If we think about our history, man has always looked to nature for methods of disease prevention and curing sickness. There are still people in remote tribes using things like tree bark and crushed dung beetles to treat infection. As we cringe and contort our faces in disgust, an incredible thing occurs – the treatments WORK. I should remind you that many new medications being developed in pharmaceutical labs have their roots in botanical and organic sources, sometimes emerging from rainforest and bush treatments.  Of course, by the time the medication makes it to market, those sources have been altered and incorporated with a multitude of synthetic agents. Bring on the light colored pill and its numerous side effects. If, however, you knew that changing what you put inside your body could help treat you, which would you gravitate to?

A young woman suffering from debilitating PMS found that incorporating more calcium rich vegetables like broccoli and dark leafy greens into her diet helped to eliminate the severity of her symptoms. Prior to visiting the Food Hospital, her only medical option was taking an anti-depressant. For other conditions, the food prescription is a little more involved. Take, for example, the Portfolio diet, which is a vegetarian diet consisting of a four key cholesterol lowering foods that bring down the levels of LDL, considered the “bad” cholesterol. This “portfolio” consists of soluble fiber, (examples include oatmeal, oat bran, barley, peas, beans, lentils, psyllium, and vegetables such as okra and eggplant) nuts, soy protein and margarine enriched with plant sterols. It can be a challenging diet, but incredibly effective. In fact, its efficacy has been comparable to that of prescription drug Lestatin. Also in that vein of challenging yet effective is the Low FODMAP diet which is prescribed to people suffering from IBS (Irritable Bowl Syndrome). The science behind this diet is that consumption of foods with high levels of fermentable sugars end up creating more liquid and gas in the gut, thus leading to the uncomfortable symptoms experienced by those who have the condition. Foods with low levels of these sugars and especially when eaten in certain combinations and amounts have been found to drastically reduce  digestive distress. Since current prescription medications for IBS have varied results and obvious risk factors (think of the recall in 2000 of Lotronex after some users died as a side effect), it’s sort of a no-brainer to go the route of Px Diet. If you never thought food could have this kind of profound impact on health, then start thinking it NOW. Just note that none of the above diet programs or other ones should be undertaken solo. The script needs to come from a registered dietician and/or doctor’s referral.

Happy eating!

Integrative Medicine, Massage Techniques Explained

Champissage – from your head down to your toes!

Way back when I was a little girl, I used to rub my father’s head in order to help him fall asleep – an early sign of my eventual path into massage therapy, I’m sure. This task was requested of all family members, but I was the only one with the patience to do it. I would mindlessly play with his hair until his tensions were chased away by slumber. Little did I know what a therapeutic thing I was truly doing for him.

In my massage practice, one of my favorite ways to end a session is with a scalp massage. I usually put a few drops of conditioning oil in my hands and then proceed to cover the circumference of the head with rhythmic strokes until the entire scalp has been moisturized. Most clients either fall asleep or zone out to the verge of sleepiness by the time I finish. I do this both to relax them and give their hair a little TLC. I never learned a specific protocol for addressing the scalp. I just kind of did what felt natural and what related to a client’s condition, if they had one.

In India, head massage is a way of life. Practiced for thousands of years, it is not only an integral part of the Indian woman’s grooming ritual, but also an alternative medicinal treatment for many conditions, as outlined in ancient Ayurvedic texts. It was brought to the west in 1973 by osteopath and massage therapist, Narendra Mehta, who felt there was a gap in the full body massage that soothing head massage could fill. Dubbing it champissage, a blend of the indian word for “head” and massage, he opened a school in London and has now made this the top complimentary technique practiced amongst therapists in the UK. The certification course is just four days long and teaches how to properly address the shoulders, upper arms, neck, scalp, face and ears to reduce stress and flush out the buildup of energetic debris that affect one’s health and well being.

The interesting thing about champissage is its ability to be a stand alone treatment, sans the full body massage. The way the course is structured, therapists learn how to address the shoulders, upper arms, neck, scalp, face and ears with massage and energetic balancing techniques based on Chakra energy. A chakra is a channel of energy that follows a central path down the body starting from the crown of one’s head and ending at the base of the spine.  Each chakra branches off in the form of “petals” that distribute their energy through the body. The zones addressed through champissage encompass 3 chakras – the crown, the brow and the throat. Each has a profound energetic representation that makes it clear to me why just performing a champissage can feel like the entire body is addressed.

The Crown chakra or Sahasrara is considered the chakra of pure consciousness. Its role is like that of the pituitary gland, which sits on its own little crown deep within the skull and regulates the body’s functions through the release of hormones via the Endocrine system and communicates with the Central Nervous System via the hypothalamus. This chakra relates to physical action with a sense of cause and affect otherwise known as karma, mental action with respect to a sense of unity and belonging to the collective universe and emotional action through a sense of experiencing another person’s experience as if you were inside them, being them.

The Brow chakra or Ajna is also known as the third eye. It’s role can be correlated  to the function of the pineal gland, which is a light sensitive gland that produces a hormone, melatonin, that regulates sleep and wakefulness. Keeping with this concept of light and dark balance, this chakra balances the higher and lower selves. It also fosters trusting inner guidance through the access of intuition. Mentally, it deals with visual consciousness and emotionally, clarity on an intuitive level.

The Throat chakra or Vishuddha relates to communication and growth through expression. This chakra is paralleled to the thyroid gland, which is located in the throat and responsible for producing hormones that regulate growth and maturation. Physically, it governs communication, emotionally independence, mentally fluent thought and spiritually, it governs a sense of security. It is associated with the upper extremities; therefore addressing this chakra affects the neck, arms and hands.

Western therapists who have learned and received champissage describe a sense of mental and physical clarity post-massage, along with an increase in mobility and reduction in tension. It makes sense when these above 3 chakras are so integral to one’s sense of self and relationship to things outside of one’s body on spiritual, emotional and mental levels. I recall when learning the neck muscles in school, our instructor cautioned that for many people the throat and face could access all kinds of emotional triggers from past traumas and experiences. That is why it became so important to foster a sense of safety and trust with the client, so that they would know it would be okay to let go, no matter what feelings bubbled up to the surface during the work. A slow buildup is the recommended protocol for energetic balancing with respect to champissage. In this way, the client can trust in the touch and be prepared for the deeper strokes that come toward the end of the massage.

Although many spas in the U.S. are starting to offer this form of massage under various marketing monikers, its therapeutic value should not be dismissed. Whether you are receiving champissage at the day spa or in the offices of a licensed practitioner, the affects are still profoundly therapeutic.

SOURCES:

http://www.massagemag.com/spa/treatment/indianhead.php

http://www.champissageinternational.com/

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chakra